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Arrow Pilots: Jack Woodman

Jack Woodman:
Flying the Arrow.
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  For example, the radar nose was sharpened, the intake lips thinned down, cross section area of the fuselage reduced below the canopy, and an extension fairing was added at the rear of the fuselage.

Engine Intake

   The CF-105 air intake was a fixed geometry intake. Intake gills immediately adjacent to the compressor inlet opened automatically at Mach 0.5 and allowed air to bypass the engine for cooling purposes and to alleviate spillage at high Mach numbers. It is interesting to note the similarity between the Arrow inlet and the McDonell F-4 inlet.

The arrangement of the intakes consisted basically of the following:

A boundary layer bleed that diverted air in the boundary layer over the top and bottom of the wing, as well as air being taken into the heat exchangers in the air-conditioning system.

An intake ramp used to create an oblique shock wave at supersonic speeds in order to achieve optimum pressure recovery characteristics inside the intake and, combined with the normal standing shock, to prevent inlet instability and inlet "unstart" over the Mach number range.

The angle of the intake ramp was 12°. Perforations were installed on the face of the ramp to prevent "intake buzz," caused by the interaction between the inlet shock and the boundary layer from the ramp.

Structures

   The structure of the CF-105 was relatively conventional. The outer wing consisted of multispar, boxbeam, heavily tapered skins and ribs running to the main spars. The outer wing was bolted to the inner wing by a peripheral joint covered by a fairing. The inner wing consisted of a main torsion box containing spars, ribs, and machined skins.

   The fuselage was designed basically around the two engines, with the cockpit in between the intakes. The engines were suspended from the inner wing. Materials used were basically aluminum and magnesium alloys, although titanium was used extensively in the area of the jet pipe, where low weight and high strength were required at temperatures up to 800°F.

   Avro manufacturing capability included a big metal-to-metal autoclave, a special heat-treat furnace, a giant skin mill, heavy machinery equipment, and a 15,000-ton rubber pad forming press, which, at the time, was the largest of its kind in the world.

   The fuselage, wings, vertical stabilizer, and control surfaces were all of metal construction. The tandem bogey main wheels were attached to the inner wing main torquebox and retracted in­board and forward. The nosewheel also retracted forward. The flying control surfaces were fully powered by two independent hydraulic systems. Speed­brakes were fitted below the fuselage, and a drag chute was installed in the aft end of the fuselage. Space in the radar nose and armament bay was utilized for test equipment and instrumentation.

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